Voodoo Is Surging

Apparently there is some connection to the Chinese Plague. Don’t ask me how all that works, I’ve never had much of an interest in it. You can explain that voodoo-that-you-do in comments if you’d like. I think that the little plastic skulls on his hat are made in China.

 

Oregon State Police – Leaving Portland

The people of Portland should be happy that the Oregon State Police are leaving the city to its own devices.

The rationale is that since looters, arsonists and rioters are being coddled by the local courts and are being encouraged by local elected leaders, their work in Portland is over.

Who can blame them? They haven’t been defunded yet, but “yet” is the operative word.

Let the riots continue until Portland has burned to the ground – is the rallying cry of the Portland residents. It’s quite something. There was a time when it was a nice area.

 

Tundra

Is it taking a theme too far?

In the area where I live, this would constitute normal after market upgrades. Those rear light guards are a real bitch to install. Ask my how I know that. And the high center-of-gravity swing arm that the tire is mounted too may end up breaking off. You can ask me how I know about that sort of thing too.

But it still begs the question of too much bling?

The warrior above, wearing make-up for the photo op, has too much ink and some bling. The Tizanos, below, does not. No ink, no bling.

A Ferrol #1, Armored Car, also called a Tiznaos (from the adjective tiznado – sooty/smokey). The Ferrol armored vehicles were made during Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). They lacked bling. They were ugly as a mud fence and not much good against armor piercing ammunition.

A single Mk 211 Mod 0 .50 BMG Raufoss would make short work of it. (no, there were no Mk 211 Raufoss rounds in 1936).

50 BMG, Saboted Light Armor Penetrator, M903

You can get some interesting .50 BMG bling rounds that do cool things. But I digress. This started out by chatting about a Tundra with some bling, didn’t it?

 

How do you say “Quiet” in Mandarin?

Type 64 and Type 67 ‘silent pistols’

Designed by Norinco, manufactured in China for clandestine operations. 7.65x17mm Type 64, 9-round removable magazine, blowback semi-automatic or manually-operated single shot (see below for why), integral suppressor, steel construction with (cheap) bakelite grips.

Communist countries as a whole seem to have a lot of fun designing silent pistols from scratch. Both the Type 64 and its evolutionary successor, the type 67 used modified rimless versions of .32ACP rounds going through an integral suppressor containing wire mesh, baffles and rubber wipes. Although they were semi-automatic designs, a crossbar in the slide allowed it to be locked in place, getting rid of any noise that would otherwise come from the action cycling. For those of you who have used or currently use silenced weapons, this can be important since the cycling weapon is louder than the discharge of the subsonic cartridge.

The trigger guard was slotted into the suppressor to keep it indexed properly. Because of a design flaw, the trigger assembly needs to be taken apart and cleaned regularly if the weapon is to retain its silent effectiveness.

 

In World War One

This is a 7.7 cm German field gun on an improvised anti-aircraft mounting structure. Both sides in that war found technology to be moving faster than they were able to keep up with it. Early anti-aircraft efforts which allowed a standard artillery piece to be fired “up” required innovation.

 

Spanish Investments

(click to enlarge) Where Do Expats Invest in Property on the Spanish Coast? You rarely see Americans hanging out on the beaches in Spain, but it’s a magnet for Europeans. I generally take a hard pass on Spain for that reason. Rhodes is nice, so is Malta. Crete is quiet but I know people there and can stay with them. They’re a lot better off than I am and they have a couple guest villas on the beach for freeloaders like me.

 

31 COMMENTS

    • It looks to be about 30% functional, but I can’t see what the undercarriage looks like. The spare tire on that weird rear swing arm bumper will likely be the first thing to break off. We can’t see what sort of articulation the rig has in rough terrain, but I always suspect hard “lifts”. Suspension lifts are something else and that’s often a good idea. Hard lifts raise the center of gravity without offering any clearance advantage (the pumpkin is still the same distance from the ground). Often hard lifts are said to allow the owner to move to larger tires. And yes, if we’re talking up and down clearance, but most of these rigs (Toyotas in particular) require that you chop the body of the vehicle in order to turn those large tires without severe rubbing.

  1. Oregon State Police are pulling out of Portland because the new DA refuses to prosecute any rioters, even for felonies. Aren’t they the ones that replaced the feds at the Federal Courthouse? Also Antifa is supposedly back at the Federal Courthouse protesting / attempting to burn it down again?

  2. Good luck, Portland.

    Always enjoyed Malta but it’s been a while. The Yacht Club overlooking Valetta harbor was fun in a colonial kind of way. Right below the old and huge British naval base. You could sense the ghosts…

  3. Tundra – Mad Max meets modern mud clinger bolt-ons (and another 800#’s…let him go across the river first). Sorta like the photo-op gal, too much of a good thing and it starts getting ridiculous.

    • Kinda like the tacticool rifle guys. I have seen rigs dolled up like that get stuck in the mud and snow deeper then my barebones 4whl drive without the lifts. God forbid it gets into an accident, insurance companies balk at paying a claim with that crap on a truck

        • I’m not a fan of pizza cutter tires. Yes, I know that tractors use them as did/do the old power wagons and Jeeps. My experience is that they offer a rough ride and don’t air-down as well as a wider tires do.

          If you are driving your old pick up around where are people are blasting, insure that it’s not running with resistor spark plug wires. They will detonate the new fangled electric blasting caps…ask me how I know.

          • insure that it’s not running with resistor spark plug wires.

            That goes counter to everything I know about this stuff. The resistor plug wires reduce radiated noise so that it doesn’t cause radio interference; the resistance dampens the “ringing” in the High Voltage side of the ignition system, making them “quieter” in radio noise.

            I had several friends who ran “Copper Core” (stranded copper wire) plug wires, and you could hear them coming on your AM car radio for several blocks, at least. The one guy running a Capacitor Discharge Ignition could be heard about a half-mile away.

            Seeing as I know less-than-zip about blasting, I’ll have to look into “modern” electric blasting caps. I always though they had a small piece of something like NiChrome wire in them that got very hot when current was applied, and that set off the compound in the cap.

            I know you have far more Real World experience in this stuff than I do, but it just doesn’t sound right….

          • Me neither actually…skinnier for me means 75/265’s whereas my rancher neighbor WHO NEVER PLOWS or grades his road swears by the pizza cutters. Told him to plow instead.

            Never knew that about resistor wires around new blasting caps. Noted.

  4. I would say the Tundra and the “warrior” are both wearing a hell of a lot of makeup.

    It looks like the truck has obstructed more field of view than I would prefer.

    I like that field expedient AA gun, though.
    -Kle.

  5. On the Tundra, what is the long cylinder on the driver’s side rear quarter panel? I know what the snorkel on the passenger side windshield, is it an exhaust pipe? Or, some type of communication antenna?

  6. Bling on pickups – I remember seeing a picture of a pickup that had so many chrome attachments added that you almost couldn’t see the pickup.
    I guess that’s one way to keep money in circulation?

    • They look good in mall parking lots to a certain class of drug dealer…along with the chrome spinner wheels and the low profile tires.

        • When working staff support at the local drug unit, one of the idiots (yes, idiots) came in all excited about finding a huge stash of pipe bombs and IEDs during one search warrant. He was so excited he activated his radio while in the closet and shouted over said radio that he had found something.

          When he told me this, I lost it. I literally asked him if he had a lick of sense in his (redacted) head, and how (redacted) far his (redacted) head was up his (redacted) (redacted?) And if he knew how much (redacted) risk he put the rest of the (redacted) (redacted) clowns in? Said cop and his gaggle of followers just about deflated when I then explained in simple, short words with some, okay, many (redacted) words splattered throughout about radio-frequency activations of blasting caps and other fun types of explosive activators.

          Even funnier was the sheriff LT standing behind me who just broke out laughing, as he (oh, did I mention he was the lead of the local bomb squad?) was just about to have a closed door head smacking session regarding radio discipline on search warrants of suspected mad bombers and cartel operations.

          Said LT asked me if I was channeling the spirit of a Marine DI, as he hadn’t heard such a professional dressing down and instruction since watching “Full Metal Jacket.”

          Sad thing is, I knew about radio discipline around blasting caps when I was… 8. Incidents like this just go to show me that my supposedly boring life was rather unboring.

          • I’ve been a front-seat spectator to some really interesting things. Thusly I have a theoretical knowledge that exceeds most peoples’ actual knowledge about a whole host of things.

            Just mostly never managed to actually get actually involved in things.

            I used to think every kid grew up like me. Guess I was lucky.

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