On December 16, 1773, a group of American colonists, dressed as Indians, boarded three ships in Boston Harbor and threw 46 tons of tea overboard.

They were protesting the Tea Act of 1773, enacted by Britain earlier that year. The Tea Act did not raise taxes on the colonists. Americans had been paying taxes on tea since 1767, when the infamous Townshend Acts were enacted. At the time, there had been so much furor over the Townshend Acts that most of its taxes—taxes on glass, lead, oil, paint, and paper—were repealed. Yet even after all those repeals, the tea tax remained. Britain wanted to prove that it had a right to tax the colonists. The colonists, of course, disagreed. They felt they should not be taxed when they had no representation in Parliament.

Context and Precedence

The Tea Act was installed to help bail out the British East India Company, which had 17 million pounds of surplus tea. The Tea Act effectively gave a monopoly to the British East India Company, and it severely undercut American merchants. Ultimately, all of these actions resurrected the old discontent: The colonists did not think that the taxes on tea were legitimate in the first place. And they did not intend to pay taxes on a forced monopoly.

The Tea Arrives

The first load of tea arrived in Boston in late November. According to British law, taxes on tea were due within 20 days of a ship arriving in harbor. Two more ships arrived on December 2 and December 15. Boston residents wanted to reject the tea and send the ship back, but the governor (a Loyalist) would not allow the ships to leave the port. The taxes for the first ship had to be paid by December 17.

The colonists were upset, to say the least, and multiple town hall-type meetings were held. One was attended by as many as 7,000 individuals! A secret plan was set into motion among a smaller subset of these colonists, the Sons of Liberty.

The Tea Goes into the Harbor

On the night of December 16, more than 100 members of the Sons of Liberty boarded the three ships and emptied their cargoes of tea into the harbor. The protest was more orderly than you might think. No looting was allowed. The protestors worked hard not to harm anything aboard the ships (except the tea). In fact, the protestors swept the ships and put everything back into place. And they returned, later, to replace the only non-tea item that had been harmed: a padlock on one of the ships.

When they were done, the protestors returned home, without attempting to discover each other’s identities. One protestor, George Hewes, later recalled the events: “We then quietly retired to our several places of residence, without having any conversation with each other, or taking any measures to discover who were our associates….There appeared to be an understanding that each individual should volunteer his services, keep his own secret, and risk the consequence for himself. No disorder took place during that transaction, and it was observed at that time that the stillest night ensued that Boston had enjoyed for many months.”

Not a Mob Mentality

The Boston Tea Party was an exceptionally well executed act of civil disobedience. It was planned and organized so that the political act of destroying the tea did not appear as a riot or as looting. Some of the Sons of Liberty who were found to have tea in their pockets were punished. It was not theft.

The Intolerable Acts

The British government was irate when it learned about the Boston Tea Party, and it responded by the British Parliament passing a series of measures “Coercive Acts,”  that would be known to the Americans as the Intolerable Acts.

“The die is now cast. The Colonies must now submit or triumph.” – King George III

Those acts included:

The Boston Port Bill – closed Boston Harbor to commerce.

The Administration of Justice Act – allowed for extradition to England for trial.

Massachusetts Government Act – outlawed public meetings and publicly elected officials.

Quartering Act – authorized that British soldiers be quartered by and fed by private citizens.

Quebec Act – expanded Quebec into the northern Ohio valley and mandated Roman Catholicism as the religion of the region.

One question you should ask yourself is, “what constitutes intolerable?”

Given the massive voting fraud that we have all witnessed in 2020 are we actually represented in Congress? It’s a question worth asking. In some districts, yes, in others, maybe, in the executive office of the president (Joe and Ho), what do you think? The down-ballot seems to have been more fairly counted than the presidential contest when likely millions of ballots were cast or fabricated by voting machines only indicating a presidential selection without regard for the down ballot.

In 1773, the revolution was still two years distant. The Declaration of Independence was two and a half years away.

And on Lexington Green, a year and a few months later, the men who stood on “the King’s Green” were British citizens, living in British North America. Their sovereign had sent his troops to disarm both them and the patriots at Concord.

21 COMMENTS

    • That’s how civilized people behave. They weren’t savages (despite the make-up) and neither were modern day Tea Party protesters.

  1. What a timely post. Taxation without representation, intolerable acts, the sulphrous stench of corruption and on. Will the country rise? I don’t know, though our distant overlords seem assured of their power, as much now as then.

    Maybe it’s wishful thinking, but there’s a lot of very unhappy people right about now, and I’d be surprised if everyone rolls over like a capsizing LCS and plays dead in the face of the coup.

      • They seem pretty confident, WSF and LSP. In the UK they are shutting down more severely over Christmas to “slow the spread” with dark rumors of a new strain of plague.

        Whatever.

        Open it all up. If you don’t want to go out and eat because you’re afraid, then don’t. Masks should be optional. There is a 99% recovery rate for most of the population. Once you’ve had it, you’re immune.

        • And the vaccine is 95% effective. (so they say, a 30 yo nurse just died on national TV, likely anaphylactic shock, which happens. It’s being covered up.) Why anyone under 80 would get vaccinated is beyond me, and even over 80 is sketchy. Serious lack of common sense. But the lemmings line up for hours “to be saved” by the gov’t.

  2. hmm, wonder where we can find some marxist tea to trash? covid masks provide them cover, why not us? oh well, i think its past that already anyway. the reckoning is upon us.

  3. Represented in Congress?

    When the so-called ruling class can outright steal an election and engage in all manner of other felonies and get away with it, even upheld as sterling examples, then no, we are NOT in fact represented in Congress, or anywhere else for that matter.

    We are all Kulaks now.

    • The democrats are already calling for us all to be sent to re-education and work camps (arbeit macht frei). And while it is true that WSF has called dibs on the job of barracks bully in one structure of one arbeitslager, there are still more opportunities to feather your nest while you learn to love Big Sister. (they will have whacked Old Joe by then)

  4. You must educate yourself. Those who engineered Biden’s win are The Real Victims. Despite their complete and utter lack of political, financial and cultural power, they somehow found the courage to do the right thing. They merely carried out the silent will of the disenfranchised and powerless. They were repairing a great, multi-generational wrong.

    Simply put, there was no fraud. It was retributive justice for all their suffering.

    • AND…I do feel their pain. Oppression for the past 10,000 years in the case of womyn requires severe retributive justice. I sense that there will be a contest between various woke and oppressed to decide WHO has been oppressed more. And since all you need do to join one of these grievance groups is to self-identify (maybe shave my legs and learn to walk like a duck), all we need do is to wait and see who comes out on top. Then hop on the band wagon in the hopes a few blocks of free government cheese.

      • Self-identify.

        Indeed. I’m thinking of becoming a Muslima. All it takes is the shahada and the declaration that I’m now female. No surgery or extraneous hormones needed in this day and age. Pious Muslimas are NOT inspected at the airport. Can’t rapeyscan them, and can’t properly pay them down. A tap on the shoulders and a verbal affirmation they have no weapons or explosives and they’re good to go. I’m anticipating that they will be similarly exempt from other things, such as The Vax.

        I’m growing a Tora Bora beard right now. We shall see if that hurts or helps my quest.

        • You need to buy the whole burka wardrobe thing, or you can buy a black sheet and just cut out eyeholes.

          And if times with the scalpel get hard, you can open a bakery in a gay neighborhood and refuse to bake them cakes without any push-back.

  5. Forget tea, I can think of a few politicians that want to return to the very reason we left England who should be tossed into a harbor.

    Pretty sure with this past year as the pinnacle of cheatery foisted on our nation by a bunch of nudges with power, we are beyond intolerable. Yet I suspect that if this action were to occur today the willfully ignorant would be crying in the streets over the loss of tea, the media would blame Trump, and the EPA would hunt down the perpetrators for polluting a navigable waterway.

    • Tossed into a harbor, tethered to a cinderblock…

      Yes, there is the EPA, which is why you need to take them out into international waters.

      Then the Tuna and other pelagic fish eat the politicians, tuna boats land the big fish, and then they’re shipped to Japan as high priced sushi. It’s a win-win.

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