Double Envelopment

Lightning Strikes Twice – An interesting blog post. Hannibal at Canae compared to General Daniel Morgan at Cowpens during the American Revolution.

In Southern Campaign, most actions were fought by smaller numbers. This battle is no exception. In comparison to the continental wars fought by foraging armies, this wouldn’t count as a skirmish. But upon small things, larger matters hang.

 

If they build an ice breaker, it should have teeth. It only stands to reason.

 

Saps

There is the beavertail sap, called a ‘slap sap’ that will knock a tooth out (above) and the 245 Gonzales sap that will take your jaw off its hinges (below).

 

The Man Who Would Be King

Creepy, corrupt and senile…great choice for Leader of the Free World. China bought him but nobody really knows whether or not he has the mental faculties to ‘stay bought’?

 

Nashville

I always preferred Memphis, but that’s just me.

 

What is worse than pants on fire?

 

All in all, it’s just a brick in the wall.

17 COMMENTS

  1. Agree about Nashville. I haven’t been there in decades, but I remember it as being a supremely ugly place – in particular music row. Nothing has come along to change my mind.

    • Memphis is smaller, with its own seedy side, but I love the food and the vibe in general. I thought of moving to Germantown (near Memphis) at one point some years ago when I was offered a job in TN. It was a prestigious job, big title, but paid TN wages, which, while good in TN, were quite a bit less than I made at the time.

    • I don’t know much more about the fat little dictator than anyone else does. He’s been ill for a long time, suffered from gout, etc. He may have the Chinese Plague or he may have some other malady, but he’s been absent for a month or so now and word has leaked out that he’s gravely ill.

      If he dies, it will certainly create a power vacuum and none of that is good for anyone – not even North Korea. Too many nukes, too many people wanting to be king. And there’s always the possibility that a potential successor will poison him. Heavy is the head that wears the crown.

      • Going through Nashville, I use one of the PKWY roads that kinda/sorta serve as a loop which avoids the multi-highway pileup mess found on the 65/24 route. It takes me to I-24 E closer to the east side of Nashville without all the headaches and the truck/pickup/car dodge ball traffic found in the mess.

  2. I walked the Cowpens battlefield in February. NASTY place, the only high ground was the crossroads, everything else was swampy. And yes, Morgan funneled Tarleton just like Cannae. Re Memphis, we actually did a dungaree liberty ‘sweep’ through the bad side and Beale St. after a couple of sailors got robbed and two others beaten and one killed in 71. After that, we didn’t have a problem the rest of the time I was at Millington.

    • Daniel Morgan (The Old Wagoneer) was a formidable opponent for the British because he was at home in rough country and they found it difficult going. He knew his opponent, as Hannibal did, and suckered them in.

      I never had trouble in Memphis, even at night, but back in those days taking me out would not have been easy and I was usually armed with a formidable blade and almost always with a handgun. “Sweeping” was a good move. Discipline among the rabble needed/needs to be maintained. I’ve done that more than once myself. (See Sap – 245 Gonzales, above for reference) You want to leave an institutional memory among the locals.

  3. Driven through Memphis a few times but never Nashville though, come to think of it, I stopped there on a Greyhound out of Detroit decades ago and walked about thinking, “Huh, this is Nashville.”

    The ICEBREAKER is important.

    • “Riding the Greyhound into Nashville” would be a great title for a country song – looking for my hound dog Blue, and the woman who did me wrong.

      I sense a hit.

  4. Never jump without a reserve. Ok, airplane drivers don’t get reserves, but I’m writing about voluntary/military jumps.

    Thanks for the post.
    Paul L. Quandt

Comments are closed.