Intentions?

(1) Is thinking that Russia or China want to physically invade the US less tethered to reality than Q-Anon? It does justify ever larger military budgets that feed the DC Beltway. And even with that, there’s nothing like a war, continually expending material to feed the beast.

(2) At the same time that the US is looking for the next war, we’re undertaking a purge of the military in the hopes of finding a day when it can be turned against the population. It’s not a conspiracy theory anymore. It’s obvious.

(3) Why is the US Navy now offering advancement examinations in languages other than English? If sailors don’t speak English, (a) why were they allowed to enlist, and if they are (b) why don’t we teach them English? Why is the navy now on the cusp of promoting based on self-identified race and gender?

(4) Black Lives matter — The word “matter” is a transitive verb, and we tend to use it as an intransitive.  Matters for what? Matters to whom? Matters why? Matters to what degree?

The Progs are following the Bolshevik belief that an elite group is needed, the Vanguard of the Proletariat, to lead the masses into revolution and towards True Communism. Dividing people based on things that they can’t control (race and gender, for example) weaken the whole.That they wind up with mass murder and something far worse then the aristocrats & serfs of old isn’t important to those who figure they’ll be part of the Nomenklatura. That Big Brother will love them back.

(5) Inflation is a good thing according to Democrats. Don’t look at food and fuel, look at the price of wood. Hope that nobody has to build anything.

 

Microaggression

This article is interesting, it’s not long and I would like you to read it in its entirety. The University of Virginia engaged in macro-aggression over the question of microaggression.

Beverly Cowell Adams

(reason.com) Kieran Bhattacharya is a student at the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine. On October 25, 2018, he attended a panel discussion on the subject of microaggressions. Dissatisfied with the definition of a microaggression offered by the presenter—Beverly Cowell Adams, an assistant dean—Bhattacharya raised his hand.

Within a few weeks, as a result of the fallout from Bhattacharya’s question about microagressions, the administration had branded him a threat to the university and banned him from campus.

Bhattacharya should have never raised his hand. Elite people are threatened by questions. It’s displayed all the time as they try to shout others down. It’s the very essence of cancel culture.

Quite apart from this article, they are beginning to weaponize law enforcement to execute their will.

Speaking of 2021, what is the difference between a public university and an asylum.

 

The Future of Medicine?

Should the “standard of care” be prioritized based only on race?

A Boston Review article titled “An Antiracist Agenda for Medicine” lays out a plan from Brigham and Women’s Hospital that implements a “reparations framework” for distributing medical resources in order to “comprehensively confront structural racism.”

I may be the one of the only people in America who sees the new “anti-racist agenda” as profoundly racist. If you dig deeply, what the medical establishment suggests is that should a white person experience a cardiac emergency, the official response will be, “sucks to be you”.

Will the progs be surprised if the reaction to somebody’s loved one dying because of race-motivated neglect is violence? Not firearms violence, but maybe a chainsaw? That would likely lead to a call for the national registration of chainsaws.

 

The LDUUV

While the United States may not be the first to operationally deploy a Large Diameter Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (LDUUV) — drone, it is not far behind with a slightly smaller sub Extra Large UUV. In February 2019, the Navy awarded Boeing a $274.4 million contract to build four (later increased to five) Orca autonomous vehicles, beating out a more elongated and cylindrical design proposed by Lockheed Martin. According to Boeing, Sea Voyager offers a range of 6,500 nautical miles and months of operation on a single fuel module. As GPS operation is only possible at the surface, it uses a Kalman filtered inertial navigation unit aided by a set of doppler velocity logs, and depth sensors to navigate underwater.

The PRX unveiled their HSU-001 submarines—the world’s first large diameter autonomous submarines to enter military service. So there is a drone gap that we must fill.

26 COMMENTS

    • There are a lot of incompetent people, who, when given some position, do not have the gray matter to support it in any way. They react against those who question whether nor not the emperor is wearing clothes with anger and vengeance.

      • Weaponization of the Peter Principle. Your principle, their peter, some violent assembly required. We shall all be obliged to bend over and receive the sacraments of their religion if this continues to its logical conclusion.

  1. “I may be the one of the only people in America who sees the new “anti-racist agenda” as profoundly racist.”

    Wrong there, you’ve got a lot of company that came to the same conclusion.

  2. Speaking of 2021, what is the difference between a public university and an asylum.

    Uh….the inmates aren’t running the asylum?

  3. I have a small shed extension project in the works for an elderly friend of mine to get his tractor out of the weather. A 6 by 6 treated post 12’ long is $70 give or take a buck or two. I went out into his pasture and cut some straight hedge (Osage orange) posts with his blessing. They will work well!

    • Osage Orange here in the Deep South is callled Bois de arc , French for .wood of the arc, of course it has been bastardized over the years and is referred to as bo doc. It is almost indestructible when it dries, it has to be cut and or split when green. Can hardly drive a nail in a dry fence post. I have some on my place that could be a hundred years old considering the size of the tree grown around them. The tree itself is gone from here as they made such great fence post.

  4. How very racist to think medicine isn’t racist. And just when I think we’re reaching Peak Insanity a new summit appears.

    Speaking of racism, trees are now examples of white supremacy which perhaps accounts for the surging price of wood. So is gardening. Expect the price of seeds to skyrocket, which is worrying when you think of it.

    • All science is racist, LSP. Just like SAT testing is racist. It shows that many inner city children who have been subject to corrupt school administrator’s practices that led to a crappy education don’t test well. How much more racist can you get?

      Farmers are mostly racist, which is why only black farmers had all their debts paid by your government.

      • “Just like SAT testing is racist.”

        Differential group outcomes [1] in cognitive and/or academic domains is entirely due to racism. Differential group outcomes in athletic domains (Pro US sports, that is) is due to evolution. The Science Is Settled (TM) on this one.

        [1] DGO is somewhat sloppy shorthand, but you get the point. What I really mean is “statistically significant differences between appropriate measures of central tendency after subjects have been grouped according to commonly-used racial categories.”

      • At one point in my employment history, a training class was demonstrating how tests were culturally biased against black people – which is why they couldn’t pass those tests. They then handed out a test which was culturally biased for blacks, to show us white folk how it worked to be on the receiving end of this bias.
        I passed the test.

    • “How very racist to think medicine isn’t racist.”

      I realize that was said ironically, but academic medicine is very much Progressive, as are senior management at a number of major pharma and medical device companies. The academic medicine bias is not surprising when you look at what kind of people comprise a large proportion of faculty at top medical schools; i.e. the politics of these academic physicians mirrors the politics of their ethnoreligious brethren (and “sistren”). Many of these people are good (or least well meaning) folks, but they definitely think too much about race, IMNSHO, which leads to seeing everything through the prism of race (and sex).

      Now there definitely ARE racial and sexual differences relevant to medicine, but the profession is schizophrenic in how we (as a whole) deal with it. On the one hand there is a lot of pretending that differences in outcomes are entirely due to racism (both in how the physician/nurse/etc treats patients, and in how the patient takes care of himself. In the latter area, if a patient does a shit job of taking care of himself, it’s the malign influence of systemic racism if Black – or some other official victim group – and poor personal responsibility if white&straight&Christian. I don’t make the rules, I just report them). On the other hand, there are people studying actual physiological racial differences. This is actually a very interesting area because if we better understand underlying racial differences, then we might do better at figuring out what role race (and racism) truly plays in outcome differences (hint: the effect of racism is not zero). Even more importantly, understanding racial differences could help improve risk stratification and prevention, and eventually treatment. (This is what “precision medicine” or “genomic medicine” is getting at, only that area claims to be doing it on an individual genetic basis — fair enough, but anyone honest about it will realize there will be racial clustering for a number of conditions.)

      At one time I did a fair amount of work in sex differences in cardiac structure and function, but have dropped it entirely the last few years. The professional conferences in that area used to be only mildly pozzed, but in the course of a mere 10 years, it’s gone full woke. Papers used to have “racial differences” (or “sex differences”) in the titles, now it’s all “Race (or sex) Disparities”. The distinction is subtle but very important. Calling a difference a disparity implies a malign influence causing that difference. Seeing as the mechanism (more likely mechanisms – note the plural, hardly anything is monofactorial) is often unknown; it’s ridiculous to call it a disparity. It’s just a difference until you better understand the etiology. In parallel with the change in attitude over the last decade, the ethnicity of those attending the major meetings has changed. Let’s just say that some groups are no longer under-represented….

      • There are two primary aspects of race, as it applies to medicine, as I see them. The first is the role that heredity plays and it’s not inconsiderable. There are predispositions based on genetics. So as not to offend, let’s stick to Ashkenazi Jewish genetic diseases that occur more often in people of Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jewish heritage than in the general population to wit: Bloom syndrome, Canavan disease, Cystic fibrosis, Familial dysautonomia, Fanconi anemia, Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, Torsion dystonia, etc. The list goes on. While I don’t personally fit into that genetic slot, I know people and of people who do and we don’t even have to digress to the sickle cell to call out differences based on historical factors that one may choose to characterize as racial.

        The other impact that race has is cultural and the question of whether culture is a choice or not can be debated, but its effect on lifestyle directly impacts medical factors. Obesity is genetic to some extent, but people can take a fork out of their mouth if they want to. You can’t change your DNA (or your gender). Culture plays to lifestyle. If you’re Pennsylvania Amish, you are likely to live a different sort of life then if you’re an inner-city Negro.

        Are people treated differently by medical professionals based on race or gender? Sure they are. Does that bias impact treatment? It has to at least to some degree, but does the outcome effect the patient to the extent that culture or DNA do? Mike_C is more qualified to address that.

        My primary care physician is ethnic Armenian. How would his experience with that lead him to treat a Turk? I have never asked him. My sense is that it wouldn’t. But I could be wrong.

  5. I’m racist because I loath assholes and some, if not many, are not “white”.Since Ancestry.com’s results show me to be 99.99% caucasian, I’m racist against most everyone I meet per the “woke” crowd (who are top to bottom assholes).

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