Global Cooling?

All of the drama from socialists about how we need to save the planet that has four years left before we’re all dead-dead-dead is very interesting if you’re looking for a way to “redistribute wealth” but the science isn’t there, is it?

Which brings to mind a completely different thing and that’s the passive nuclear reactor under our feet. Oh, I know that the left hates nuclear energy. But it’s there and it’s what keeps tectonic plates subducting carbon and keeps the planet living.

Current evidence suggests that all the earth’s heating takes place in the mantle and crust, not the core.

All models of the inner Earth depend on indirect evidence. Leading models of the kind known as bulk silicate Earth (BSE) assume that the mantle and crust contain only lithophiles (“rock-loving” elements) and the core contains only siderophiles (elements that “like to be with iron”). Thus all the heat from radioactive decay comes from the crust and mantle – about eight terawatts from uranium 238 (238U), another eight terawatts from thorium 232 (232Th), and four terawatts from potassium 40 (40K).

The nuclear reactor in the Earth is a passive heat engine that just happens due to the content of radioactive materials undergoing natural decay and releasing heat. A nuclear reactor in the human built sense is an active heat engine where natural decay is accelerated by changing the neutron flux in a core bundle of fuel rods with highly purified materials. The Sun is another kind of nuclear reactor.

This is a decay process that can not sustain a chain reaction, so nuclear explosions are not in the cards. Just heat.

Between the active heat generation and the rate of radiative cooling, it is estimated that the Earth’s core will stay molten for 91 billion years even though our sun only has 5–7 billion years left. The size and density of the earth insulates the heat very effectively. That is why the crust is cool and why it will take almost 100 billion years to cool the core of the Earth completely.

 

The Grids

Snacks

A crawdad/shrimp/crab boil makes for a powerful snack, and it will reliably diminish your hunger pains.  The problem is that the best boils are fresh and you won’t get that in Arizona.

Fried mac and cheese with a side of hot sauce for dipping is not heart heathy, but it’s good – and do you really want to live forever?

Bacon and cheese fries are unlikely to extend your life. I like them with sour cream and chives to dip, but you may prefer ranch.

Is this turning into a food blog?

Steak and garlic fries can improve your outlook on life in general.

 

How Long does DNA Remain Intact?

(full article) I suspect that the answer to that specific question is not knowable, but scientists are working on mammoth genomes. Permafrost-preserved teeth, up to 1.6 million years old, identify a new kind of mammoth in Siberia.

An illustration of the steppe mammoths that preceded the woolly mammoth

Ancient DNA retrieved from different mammoth species is illuminating a complex evolutionary picture.Credit: Beth Zaiken/Centre for Palaeogenetics

Mammoth teeth preserved in eastern Siberian permafrost have produced the oldest ancient DNA on record, pushing the technology close to — but perhaps not past — its limits.

Genomic DNA extracted from a trio of tooth specimens excavated in the 1970s has identified a new kind of mammoth that gave rise to a later North American species. The findings were published in Nature, yesterday.

Researchers had suspected that ancient DNA could survive beyond one million years, if the right sample could be found. Once an organism dies, its chromosomes shatter into pieces that get shorter over time. Eventually, the DNA strands become so small that — even if they can be extracted — they lose their information content.

Ancient genomes: Timeline showing the ages of the oldest human and animal DNA that has been sequenced.

 

30 COMMENTS

  1. I’ve heard it said that a steady diet of that comfort food will kill you before you reach Fifty. My reply is “Mebbe so, but I’ll be smilin’ when I hit the floor”. As seen elsewhere, “I can still drink like I was 20. I just can’t recover like I was 20”. Thus endeth the lesson.

  2. Eat what you will, experience great food…die young and leave a good looking corpse. Besides, “It’s my body…” and any nudge telling me how to live and what to eat – sorta like that Prius driver in the LH lane going 55 in a 65 as some narcissistic social statement – can go pound sand. Now I’m hungry…for all the above, and if I keel-over afterwards at least I’ll be smiling.

  3. Okay, maybe if I switch to a vegan diet including Bill Gates artificial steak I’ll live another five years, but with that diet, why would I want to?

  4. Low Country Boil, yum. I grew up 40 miles from Darian GA where dad launched his 28 foot Cobia out of Two Way Fish Camp to fish “G” and “F” reefs.

  5. Steak and chips?!? (fries)

    YES, YES, YES.

    I like the look of that fried Mac Cheese too. Well, it is Lent. And congrats on your relaunch as a food blog. We’ll have to do a podcast, “Cooking With…”

  6. This blog is gonna kill me so good.

    I lived for 30+ years in what is known as a ‘cow county’ in California. San Luis Obispo was one of the few counties to supply beef to the 49s and ever since. Lots of ranches in those parts, many are my good friends. Boy howdy, they know beef. Just a few miles south is the home of the Tri-Tip cut of beef. done right it melts in your mouth like butter and you can’t shut up about it.

    I also am somewhat a sea food snob. Having been raised on or in the ocean, even having to catch our own dinner because we were too poor so we had to eat fresh caught lobster, crab, and fish.

    I suppose it was natural I worked as a commercial fisherman for most of a decade. Then for a time I was a route driver for my friend’s sea food distribution company. Does it make sense to ship, say Maine lobsters to CA only to be shipped to a restaurant in…Maine? Such are the willy ways of that industry. But air travel does allow only hours to elapse on transcontinental deliveries, so there is that. But how much of a betting man are you? I do not fancy placing bets on expensive culinary delights.

    So yeah, I snorted my disgust when visiting my sister in Pheonix and she suggested a sushi restaurant. It was ‘really good’ she insisted. In good humor I said okay. Bad call. A very bad call.

    • Hah! Oysters in Petaluma, CA turned out to be a guy-wrenchingly (literally) bad call.

      Amusing, but less explosive, was being recommended “fresh Atlantic salmon and live Maine lobster” at a seafood place in Vancouver, BC, the evening after we arrived from …. Boston.

  7. Dammit, now my mouth is watering and I want a crawfish and shrimp boil, but I’ll be damned if I’m going to go out in this cold and do it… And yes, some of that globull warming would be nice about now.

  8. “Globular Wormening”…..the biggest grifters scheme in the history on mankind. And proof that half, or more, of our society are abject morons for buying into the scheme.

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