Basics

I am fundamentally opposed to military intervention in distant lands without clear goals and an exit strategy. You can argue that in cases like Pearl Harbor that we had no choice but to go for broke and I can’t disagree. In the case of the 9/11 attack, our allies and oil suppliers were behind it…and so we couldn’t very well attack them. Therefore, we attacked Afghanistan, at the time run by our ally, Pakistan, through their cat’s paw, the Taliban/Pushtun.

The question that many of you ask is whether or not the USA will end up in a shooting war with the People’s Republic of China. Maybe not, if we’re strong enough? Maybe not if we have people in the White House that would surrender the place to the PRC? Freedom requires strength – serious moral fiber. Universities don’t build moral fiber, they work diligently to undermine it.

Back when I did undergrad work, there was a Marxist professor who threw me out of class. I was not disrespectful of the filthy cur. I just sat there in the front row with my hair cut short, my clothes neatly pressed, and stood for something very differently than the anti-American rhetoric he promoted at taxpayer expense.  He threw out a reserve Marine captain who showed up in uniform before he tossed me. The bastard had tenure…there you go. Grad school was the Naval Postgraduate School and things were very different there.

Freedom Means Respect

Respect for each other, respect for so many people who have left it all on the field before us in the hopes that we would make the world better by building on what they did and what they sacrificed.

Universities don’t teach respect. Maybe they never did?

 

Teach your children and grandchildren about how things are supposed to work.

Chickens were traditionally machines to convert agrarian debris (bugs, seeds) into protein-rich eggs. Their current battery-farming use turning corn feed into breast, thigh, and wing meat is relatively novel.

Pigs are traditionally a way to convert farm waste and forest forage (grubs, mushrooms, nuts) into fat and protein, with pigs hardy enough to stand up to the forest’s threats

Cows turn grassland forage into protein-rich milk, meat, and leather. Cows are sturdy enough to be turned loose to live freely outside of direct supervision for long periods in secured territory and then rounded up, so can be raised with little labor on large amounts of poor land. Can move long distances under own power, can be raised in remote areas and sold fresh in high-demand population centers. Dairy herds, by contrast, were kept right outside population centers. Quick-spoiling milk can be processed into cooking lipid butter and stable, transportable, marketable protein source cheese. Can be used as traction-generating and load-bearing beasts.

Sheep are similar to cows at smaller scale and requiring closer attention, process grassland into mutton, milk, and wool, once most important textile in world before cotton.

Horses convert grassland to service as traction-generating and load-bearing beasts. Intelligently trainable, nimblest animals practical to ride.

Donkeys convert grassland to service as traction-generating and load-bearing beasts. Size and output/consumption ratio makes more practical than horses for many applications, but intensely annoying.

Mules – we bred a donkey with a horse to make it less annoying.

Deer, Antelope, Elk, Turkeys, Ducks, Pheasants, etc. – game animals. Sustain their own life cycle from undeveloped land, are hunted in regulated fashion to sustain stock.

Bees – plant-fertilizing function radically increases productivity of fields, yields rich, high-sugar, indefinitely stable honey

Doves – we used to farm doves,  big-ass birdhouses out in the fields. Not sure how that started.

Ostriches – one of those ’80s things, a tax dodge that mist have sounded cool to city people on cocaine.

 

It pains me to through food away. It’s not about eating everything on your plate. It’s about the fact that things had to die to get there on the plate, whether wheat, or a chicken, or whatever. Sure, there are times that you need to toss food, but when you do, do so with respect for your place in the chain.

 

My respect for politicians is far less than my respect for “food”. You’ll note that I didn’t mention the “leach” and its place in the swamp.

 

Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof, make counterallegations, find a scapegoat (It is Raven’s fault)

15 COMMENTS

  1. Nice photo of Francis “Gabby” Gabreski and his ground crew. He actually got airborne on December 7th. For those interested, here is everything you ever wanted to know about the P-47–

    https://www.cradleofaviation.org/history/history/aircraft/p-47_thunderbolt_aviation_darwinism.html

    Cows–converting solar into ribeyes since forever. I have heard they have a special breed in west Texas for arid climates, called the 10-80–a mouth 10 ft. wide and can travel 80mph to get enough to eat. Cattle (beef and dairy) need plenty of water. In arid climates, they will not venture far from the water source. Just one more reason my maternal great grandfather raised sheep and goats (Sanderson, TX).

    My B of S is in rangeland management (ill timed for gainful employment, but that’s another story). It is great fun to put a store-wrapped package of grass fattened beef with yellowed fat (from beta-carotene) in front of some soccer moms and watch the run away in horror.

    • Gabreski didn’t load with tracers. He liked to get right up on the Germans and plow them with the 8 fifties without them getting the sense of what was coming.

      We have a lot of cattle being run in the national forest where I live. There are a lot of “tanks” (ponds) built to store water that splashes in from the snow melt or monsoon, which started yesterday.

  2. Pigs are great at disposing of people, too. (One of the many reasons for high childhood death in the Middle Ages, surprisingly.) A decent pig farm is an excellent ‘garbage disposal.’

    As to the last photo and statement? SSS is a way of life. Shoot, Shovel, Shut up!

  3. I did it all. With pride. I will stand tall and accept the blame of the universe.
    Wayne is old and tired now, someone had to step up to the plate.
    (those who like “the far side” will remember.)

  4. Spent some time today reflecting on the current social climate vs the weeks after 9/11. Little has changes IMO. We have the doers and the talkers. Is this the way things have always been?

    • The question that many of you ask is whether or not the USA will end up in a shooting war with the People’s Republic of China. Maybe not, if we’re strong enough?
      I recall one of Sun Zu’s lessons of the young emperor who had come to power abruptly due to the unexpected death of his father.
      A few months after assuming the throne a neighboring kingdom attacked.
      The young emperor called a meeting of his advisors and generals.
      He asked them, “What did I do wrong”
      There was a spy for the attacking kingdom at the meeting.
      He reported back to the enemy emperor what the young emperor said.
      The enemy advisors and generals counseled the enemy emperor to retreat back within its borders and make no further hostile moves against the young emperor,because he understood it was his responsibility to protect his people and did not blame others for his deficiencies.
      Had he been a known badass that instilled fear in his neighbors the enemy would have never attacked, because an attack on his people would result in a devastating response toward the attacker.

      Regarding 9/11 the same lesson is applicable and also brings to mind Roman history:
      As Cato said after fighting the Punic Wars over the course of two hundred years and having to fight Carthage again, “Carthago delenda est.”
      Have you ever met a Carthaginian?
      Didn’t think so.
      Ask Scipio why.

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